TRC Chaperone Training

Course Overview

Program Administration

Rideshare Etiquette

Preparing Mentally

Words Matter

Assistive Devices

Service Animals

Meeting the Client

Visible and Hidden Disabilities

In Case of Medical Concerns

Difficult Situations

Well-being of Your Client

COVID-19 Protocol

Online Certification Quiz

Service Animals

​ADA Law

According to the US Justice Department, Civil Rights Division. We have the following:

 

Overview

  • Beginning on March 15, 2011, only dogs are recognized as service animals under titles II and III of the ADA.

  • A service animal is a dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for a person with a disability.

 

Generally, title II and title III entities must permit service animals to accompany people with disabilities in all areas where members of the public are allowed to go.

How “Service Animal” Is Defined

Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, or performing other duties. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA.

Some State and local laws also define service animal more broadly than the ADA does. Information about such laws can be obtained from the State attorney general’s office.

Where Service Animals Are Allowed

Under the ADA, State and local governments, businesses, and nonprofit organizations that serve the public generally must allow service animals to accompany people with disabilities in all areas of the facility where the public is normally allowed to go. For example, in a hospital it would be inappropriate to exclude a service animal from areas such as patient rooms, clinics, cafeterias, or examination rooms.

Service Animals Must Be Under Control

Under the ADA, service animals must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered, unless these devices interfere with the service animal’s work or the individual’s disability prevents using these devices.

Treatment of Service Animals

A service animal is not a pet and when it is in public, assisting its owner, it is not to be touched without permission.

Ride Hailing Service Policy and Protocols

As stated above, a service dog is allowed wherever the public would usually be allowed to go. Checking with the driver should be done as a courtesy, explaining the need for the animal.

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